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Working Long Hours and Early Career Outcomes in the High-End Labor Market

Dora Gicheva

No 10-3, UNCG Economics Working Papers from University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics

Abstract: This study establishes empirically a nonlinear relationship between hours worked per week and hourly wage growth: for workers who put in 48 hours per week or more, working 5 extra hours per week increases annual wage growth by about 1 percent. The average effect is zero when hours are below 48. This relationship is especially strong for young professional workers. I provide evidence in support of a model of promotions that combines higher skill-sensitivity of output in upper levels of the job ladder with worker heterogeneity. The results can be used to account for part of the gender wage gap.

Keywords: wage growth; working hours; promotions; gender wage gap; disutility of labor (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J22 J24 J31 M51 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 66 pages
Date: 2010-08-26
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-lab
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Journal Article: Working Long Hours and Early Career Outcomes in the High-End Labor Market (2013) Downloads
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