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Is women's ownership of land a panacea in developing countries? Evidence from land-owning farm households in Malawi

Sumon Bhaumik (), Ralitza Dimova () and Ira Gang ()

Departmental Working Papers from Rutgers University, Department of Economics

Abstract: Our analysis of a rich representative household survey for Malawi, where patrilineal and matrilineal institutions coexist, suggests that (a) in matrilineal societies the likelihood of high value crop cultivation by a household increases with the extent of land owned by males, while the income generated from high value crop production decreases with the amount of land owned by females (b) cultivation of high value crops increases household welfare. The policy implication is that facilitating female ownership of assets through informal and formal institutions does not, on its own, increase welfare when appropriate complementary resources and institutions are absent.

Keywords: female ownership of assets; informal institutions; cash crops; household welfare; empowerment (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: Q12 O2 O13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-agr
Date: 2015-11-25
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Related works:
Journal Article: Is Women’s Ownership of Land a Panacea in Developing Countries? Evidence from Land-Owning Farm Households in Malawi (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: Is Women's Ownership of Land a Panacea in Developing Countries? Evidence from Land-Owning Farm Households in Malawi (2014) Downloads
Working Paper: Is women's ownership of land a panacea in developing countries? Evidence from land-owning farm households in Malawi (2013) Downloads
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