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Property rights on First Nations’ reserve land

Fernando Aragon () and Anke Kessler

Discussion Papers from Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University

Abstract: This paper examines the economic effects of existing private property rights on First Nations’ reserves. We focus on three forms of land tenure regimes: lawful possession, designated land, and permits. These land regimes have been used to create individual land holdings, and grant, secure and transferable, rights of use of reserve land to band and non-band members. Using confidential Census micro-data and rich administrative data, we find evidence of improvements in home ownership and housing conditions, as well as increments in band’s public spending. However, we do not find significant effects on household income nor employment outcomes. Instead, we document a sizeable increase in non-Aboriginal population. Our findings suggest that some caution is warranted when discussing the potential economic benefits of property rights reforms for First Nations’ communities.

Keywords: First Nations; property rights; lawful possession (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017-08
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-law and nep-ure
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http://www.sfu.ca/repec-econ/sfu/sfudps/dp17-14.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Property rights on First Nations reserve land (2020) Downloads
Working Paper: Property rights on First Nations' reserve land (2018) Downloads
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