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The Ballot Order Effect is Huge: Evidence from Texas

Darren Grant ()

No 1606, Working Papers from Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business

Abstract: Texas primary and runoff elections provide an ideal test of the ballot order hypothesis, because ballot order is randomized within each county and there are many counties and contests to analyze. Doing so for all statewide offices contested in the 2014 Democratic and Republican primaries and runoffs yields precise estimates of the ballot order effect across twenty-four different contests. Except for a few high-profile, high-information races, the ballot order effect is large, especially in down-ballot races and judicial positions. In these, going from last to first on the ballot raises a candidate’s vote share by nearly ten percentage points.

Keywords: Voting; Ballot order; Behavioral economics (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D72 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 43 pages
Date: 2016-05
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cdm and nep-pol
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1)

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http://www.shsu.edu/academics/economics-and-intern ... es/wp16-06_paper.pdf (application/pdf)

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Journal Article: The ballot order effect is huge: evidence from Texas (2017) Downloads
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