EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Low-Income Demand for Local Telephone Service: Effects of Lifeline and Linkup

Daniel Ackerberg (), Michael Riordan, Gregory Rosston () and Bradley Wimmer
Additional contact information
Gregory Rosston: Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, Stanford University
Bradley Wimmer: Department of Economics, St. Lawrence University

No 08-047, Discussion Papers from Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

Abstract: This study evaluates the effect of the “Lifeline” and “Linkup” subsidy programs on telephone penetration rates of low-income households. It is the first to estimate low-income telephone demand across demographic groups using location-specific Lifeline and Linkup prices. The demand specifications use a discrete choice model aggregated across demographic groups. GMM estimators correct for the possible endogeneity of subsidized prices. A simulation predicts low-income telephone penetration would be 4.1 percentage points lower without Lifeline and Linkup. Results suggest that Linkup is more cost-effective than Lifeline, and that automatic enrollment in the programs increases penetration.

Keywords: telephone subsidies; low-income telephone usuers (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: O30 H20 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2009-08, Revised 2009-08
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (3) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www-siepr.stanford.edu/repec/sip/08-047.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Low-Income Demand for Local Telephone Service: Effects of Lifeline and Linkup (2008) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:sip:dpaper:08-047

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Discussion Papers from Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Anne Shor (). This e-mail address is bad, please contact .

 
Page updated 2020-09-07
Handle: RePEc:sip:dpaper:08-047