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Syndicated loans and CDS positioning

Iñaki Aldasoro and Andreas Barth

No 58, ESRB Working Paper Series from European Systemic Risk Board

Abstract: This paper analyzes banks’ usage of CDS. Combining bank-firm syndicated loan data with a unique EU-wide dataset on bilateral CDS positions, we find that stronger banks in terms of capital, funding and profitability tend to hedge more. We find no evidence of banks using the CDS market for capital relief. Banks are more likely to hedge exposures to relatively riskier borrowers and less likely to sell CDS protection on domestic firms. Lead arrangers tend to buy more protection, potentially exacerbating asymmetric information problems. Dealer banks seem insensitive to firm risk, and hedge more than non-dealers when they are more profitable. These results allow for a better understanding of banks’ credit risk management. JEL Classification: G21, G28

Keywords: asymmetric information; capital regulation; CDS; cross-border lending; EMIR; speculation; syndicated loans (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-ban
Date: 2017-11
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