EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Appraising research policy instrument mixes: a multicriteria mapping study in six European countries of diagnostic innovation to manage antimicrobial resistance

Josie Coburn, Frederique Bone, Andy C. Stirling, Michael M. Hopkins (), Jorge Mestre-Ferrandiz, Stathis Arapostathis and Martin J. Llewelyn
Additional contact information
Josie Coburn: Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex Business School, Falmer, Brighton, UK
Frederique Bone: Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex Business School, Falmer, Brighton, UK
Andy C. Stirling: Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex Business School, Falmer, Brighton, UK
Michael M. Hopkins: Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex Business School, Falmer, Brighton, UK
Jorge Mestre-Ferrandiz: Office of Health Economics, London, UK
Stathis Arapostathis: Department of History and Philosophy of Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Martin J. Llewelyn: Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Brighton, UK.

SPRU Working Paper Series from SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex Business School

Abstract: This article provides prospective appraisal of key policy instruments intended to stimulate innovation to combat antimicrobial resistance (AMR). AMR refers to the ability of microbes to evolve resistance to those treatments designed to kill them, and is associated with the overuse or misuse of medicines such as antibiotics. AMR is an emerging global challenge with major implications for healthcare and society as a whole. Diagnostic tests for infectious diseases can guide decision making when prescribing medicines, so reducing inappropriate drug use. In the context of growing international interest in policies to stimulate innovation in AMR diagnostics, this study uses multicriteria mapping (MCM) to appraise a range of policy instruments in order to understand their potential performance while also highlighting the uncertainties that stakeholders hold about such interventions in complex contexts. A contribution of the article is the demonstration of a novel method to analyse and visualise MCM data in order to reveal stakeholder inclinations towards particular options while exploring interviewees’ uncertainties about the effectiveness of each instrument’s design or implementation. The article reports results from six European countries (Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and the UK). The findings reveal which policy instruments are deemed most likely to perform well, and why, across stakeholder groups and national settings, with areas of common ground and difference being identified. Importantly, the conclusions presented here differ from prominent policy discourse, with international implications for the design of mixes of policy instruments to combat AMR. Strategic and practical methodological implications also emerge for general appraisal of innovation policy instrument mixes.

Keywords: Multicriteria mapping; policy instrument mixes; antimicrobial resistance; diagnostic innovation; policy evaluation; foresight appraisal (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2021-05
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.sussex.ac.uk/business-school/documents/2021-03-coburn-et-al.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:sru:ssewps:2021-03

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in SPRU Working Paper Series from SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex Business School Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by University of Sussex Business School Communications Team ().

 
Page updated 2022-09-29
Handle: RePEc:sru:ssewps:2021-03