EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Health Shocks and the Evolution of Consumption and Income over the Life-Cycle

Michael Keane (), Elena Capatina () and Shiko Maruyama ()

No 2018-14, Discussion Papers from School of Economics, The University of New South Wales

Abstract: This paper studies the effects of health on earnings dynamics and on consumption inequality over the life-cycle. We build and calibrate a life-cycle model with idiosyncratic health, earnings and survival risk where individuals make labor supply and asset accumulation decisions, adding two novel features. First, we model health as a complex multi-dimensional concept. We differentiate between functional health and underlying health risk, temporary vs. persistent health shocks, and predictable vs. unpredictable shocks. Second, we study the interactions between health and human capital accumulation (learning-by-doing). These features are important in allowing the model to capture the degree to which, and the pathways through which, health impacts earnings and consumption patterns. They are also very important in estimating the value of health insurance and social insurance. A key finding is that health shocks account for roughly half of the growth in offer wage inequality over the life cycle. Eliminating health shocks leads to a 5.5% decline in the variance of the present value of earnings across all individuals.

Keywords: Health; Income Risk; Precautionary Saving; Health Insurance; Welfare (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D91 E21 I14 I31 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dge, nep-hea, nep-ias and nep-mac
Date: 2018-05
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (2) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://research.economics.unsw.edu.au/RePEc/papers/2018-14.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:swe:wpaper:2018-14

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Discussion Papers from School of Economics, The University of New South Wales Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Hongyi Li ().

 
Page updated 2019-11-05
Handle: RePEc:swe:wpaper:2018-14