EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Employment Discrimination in Georgia: Evidence from a Field Experiment

Muhammad Asali (), Norberto Pignatti () and Sophiko Skhirtladze

Working Papers from International School of Economics at TSU, Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia

Abstract: We provide experimental evidence about ethnic discrimination in the labor market in Georgia. We randomly assign Georgian and non-Georgian, male and female, names to similar resumes and apply for jobs as advertised in help-wanted web sites in Georgia. We find that gender has no effect on the probability of callback, but a job applicant who is ethnic Georgian is twice more likely to be called for a job interview than an equally skilled ethnic non-Georgian (Azeri or Armenian). The almost 100% gap in callbacks is statistically significant and cannot be abridged by having more experience or education. Both taste-based discrimination and statistical discrimination models are consistent with the evidence provided in this study. Labor market discrimination tends to aggravate in economic busts.

Pages: 24 pages
Date: 2017
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cis, nep-cwa and nep-exp
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Published

Downloads: (external link)
https://iset.tsu.ge/files/wp_04-17_Employment_Discrimination_in_Georgia.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Employment Discrimination in a Former Soviet Union Republic: Evidence from a Field Experiment (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Employment Discrimination in Georgia: Evidence from a Field Experiment (2017) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:tbs:wpaper:17-004

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from International School of Economics at TSU, Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ( this e-mail address is bad, please contact ).

 
Page updated 2021-04-10
Handle: RePEc:tbs:wpaper:17-004