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Gender Differences in Response to Setbacks: Evidence from Professional Tennis

Lauren Banko (), Eva Leeds () and Michael Leeds ()
Additional contact information
Lauren Banko: Department of Economics, Temple University
Eva Leeds: Department of Economics and Business, Moravian College

No 1402, DETU Working Papers from Department of Economics, Temple University

Abstract: A large experimental literature has arisen that shows significant differences in how men and women respond to economic contests. Non-experimental studies, however, frequently contradict the experimental findings. We use data from the ATP and WTA professional tennis tours (in which all contests are best-of-three matches) to test one prediction of the experimental literature: that women react more negatively to setbacks than men do. Ordered probits show that women who lose the first set are no more likely to lose the match in either straight sets or three sets than men are. Similarly, binomial probits show that women who win the first set but lose the second are no more likely to lose the third than men are. However, we do find that women who do lose in straight sets generally lose by larger margins than men do.

Keywords: Economic Contests; Sports; Tennis; Setbacks; Gender Differences (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J16 L83 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2014-04
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-spo
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http://www.cla.temple.edu/RePEc/documents/DETU_14_02.pdf First version, 2014 (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Gender Differences in Response to Setbacks: Evidence from Professional Tennis (2016) Downloads
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