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Labor Market Conditions at School-leaving: Long-run Effects on Marriage and Fertility

Johanna Maclean, Reginald Covington () and Asia Sikora Kessler ()
Additional contact information
Reginald Covington: Mathematica Policy Research
Asia Sikora Kessler: Department of Health Promotion, University of Nebraska Medical Center

No 1508, DETU Working Papers from Department of Economics, Temple University

Abstract: In this study, we assess the long-run impact of labor market conditions at the time of school-leaving on marriage and fertility outcomes. We draw data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. Our sample left school between 1976 and 1989, and we use variation in the state unemployment rate at the time of school-leaving to identify persistent effects. We find that men who left school when the state unemployment rate was high are less likely to be married and have children at age 45, but are more likely to be divorced. Women, however, are more likely to have children.

Keywords: marriage; fertility; school-leaving; business cycles (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J1 J2 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2015-04
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-lma and nep-ure
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http://www.cla.temple.edu/RePEc/documents/DETU_15_08.pdf First version, 2015 (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: LABOR MARKET CONDITIONS AT SCHOOL-LEAVING: LONG-RUN EFFECTS ON MARRIAGE AND FERTILITY (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: Labor Market Conditions at School-Leaving: Long-Run Effects on Marriage and Fertility (2016) Downloads
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