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Coordinated Work Schedules and the Gender Wage Gap

German Cubas (), Chinhui Juhn () and Pedro Silos ()
Additional contact information
German Cubas: Department of Economics, University of Houston
Chinhui Juhn: Department of Economics, University of Houston

No 2002, DETU Working Papers from Department of Economics, Temple University

Abstract: Using U.S. time diary data we construct occupation-level measures of coordinated work schedules based on the concentration of hours worked during peak hours of the day. A higher degree of coordination is associated with higher wages but also a larger gender wage gap. In the data women with children allocate more time to household care and are penalized by missing work during peak hours. An equilibrium model with these key elements generates a gender wage gap of 6.6 percent or approximately 30 percent of the wage gap observed among married men and women with children. If the need for coordination is equalized across occupations and set to a relatively low value (i.e. Health care support), the gender gap would fall by more than half to 2.7 percent.

Keywords: Labor Supply; Occupations; Coordination; Work Schedules; Time Use; Gender Wage Gap (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J2 J3 E2 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020-01
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dem, nep-lma, nep-ltv and nep-mac
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http://www.cla.temple.edu/RePEc/documents/DETU_20_02.pdf First version, 2020 (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Coordinated Work Schedules and the Gender Wage Gap (2019) Downloads
Working Paper: Coordinated Work Schedules and the Gender Wage Gap (2018) Downloads
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