EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Opioid Epidemic: Causes and Consequences

Carolina Arteaga Cabrales and Victoria Barone ()

Working Papers from University of Toronto, Department of Economics

Abstract: This paper studies the origins and consequences of the opioid epidemic. Drawing on recently unsealed documents from state litigation against Purdue Pharma, we instrument for the supply of prescription opioids by exploiting features of the initial marketing of OxyContin. We find that moving from the 25th-to-the-75th percentile in the distribution of prescription opioid supply increases deaths from prescription opioids by 89% and deaths from all opioids by 39%. This corresponds to over 200,000 deaths. We estimate that the opioid crisis did not have an effect on labor market outcomes, such as labor force participation or employment rates, but it had adverse effects on socioeconomic conditions, as indicated by increased claims from SNAP and disability and increased crime. We estimate decreases in pregnancy duration, birth weight and health at birth but no effect on infant mortality and we estimate an increase in fertility rates.

Keywords: Opioids; Mortality; Health (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I18 I30 J13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: Unknown pages
Date: 2021-06-08
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dem and nep-hea
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (3) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.economics.utoronto.ca/public/workingPapers/tecipa-698.pdf Main Text (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:tor:tecipa:tecipa-698

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from University of Toronto, Department of Economics 150 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by RePEc Maintainer ().

 
Page updated 2023-08-20
Handle: RePEc:tor:tecipa:tecipa-698