EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Simultaneous Search and Adverse Selection

Sarah Auster, Piero Gottardi () and Ronald Wolthoff ()

Working Papers from University of Toronto, Department of Economics

Abstract: We study the effect of diminishing search frictions in markets with adverse selection by presenting a model in which agents with private information can simultaneously contact multiple trading partners. We highlight a new trade-off: facilitating contacts reduces coordination frictions but also the ability to screen agents' types. We find that, when agents can contact sufficiently many trading partners, fully separating equilibria obtain only if adverse selection is sufficiently severe. When this condition fails, equilibria feature partial pooling and multiple equilibria co-exist. In the limit, as the number of contacts becomes large, some of the equilibria converge to the competitive outcomes of Akerlof (1970), including Pareto dominated ones; other pooling equilibria continue to feature frictional trade in the limit, where entry is inefficiently high. Our findings provide a basis to assess the effects of recent technological innovations which have made meetings easier.

Keywords: search; adverse selection; screening; labor market; coordination frictions; search frictions (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D82 D83 E24 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: Unknown pages
Date: 2022-09-04
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-mic
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.economics.utoronto.ca/public/workingPapers/tecipa-734.pdf Main Text (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Simultaneous Search and Adverse Selection (2022) Downloads
Working Paper: Simultaneous Search and Adverse Selection (2022) Downloads
Working Paper: Simultaneous Search and Adverse Selection (2022) Downloads
Working Paper: Simultaneous Search and Adverse Selection (2022) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:tor:tecipa:tecipa-734

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from University of Toronto, Department of Economics 150 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by RePEc Maintainer ().

 
Page updated 2023-01-27
Handle: RePEc:tor:tecipa:tecipa-734