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The Impact of Victimisation on Subjective Well-Being

Matthew Shannon

No 202123, Working Papers from School of Economics, University College Dublin

Abstract: This paper uses the UK Household Longitudinal Study to explore the relationship between victimisation and several measures of subjective well-being. Using person fixed effects models, I find that being attacked or insulted both significantly reduce well-being at the mean, with no significant differences between men and women in the effect size. Next, using unconditional quantile regression with fixed effects models, I identify the highly heterogeneous effects of victimisation along the unconditional well-being distribution. The effect of victimisation on subjective wellbeing is monotonically decreasing, with those at ‘worse’ quantiles of the well-being distribution experiencing the largest falls in well-being, and those at the ‘better’ quantiles of the distribution experiencing the smallest falls.

Keywords: Victimisation; Subjective well-being (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: C21 I31 J00 J17 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 82 pages
Date: 2021-09
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hap and nep-ltv
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http://hdl.handle.net/10197/12564 First version, 2021 (application/pdf)
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