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Reconnecting Money to Inflation: The Role of the External Finance Premium

Jagjit Chadha (), Luisa Corrado () and Sean Holly ()

Studies in Economics from School of Economics, University of Kent

Abstract: We re-connect money to inflation using Goodfriend and McCallum’s (2007) model where banks supply loans to cash-in-advance constrained consumers on the basis of the value of collateral provided and the monitoring skills of banks. We show that when shocks to monitoring and collateral dominate those to goods productivity and the velocity of money demand, money and the external finance premium become closely linked. This is because increases in asset prices allow banks to raise the supply of loans leading to an expansion in aggregate demand, via a compression of financial interest rates spreads, which in turn tends to be inflationary. Thus money and financial spreads are negatively correlated when banking sector shocks dominate. We suggest a simple augmented stabilising monetary policy rule that exploits the joint information from money and the external finance premium.

Keywords: money; DSGE; policy rules; external finance premium (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: E31 E40 E51 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cba, nep-dge and nep-mac
Date: 2008-11
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