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Intra-household Resource Allocation and Familial Ties

Harounan Kazianga () and Zaki Wahhaj

Studies in Economics from School of Economics, University of Kent

Abstract: In this paper, we investigate the link between intra-household resource allocation and familial ties between household members. We show that, within the same geographic, economic and social environments, households where members have 'stronger' familial ties (e.g. a nuclear family household) achieve near Pareto efficient allocation of productive resources and Pareto efficient allocation of consumption while households with 'weaker' familial ties (e.g. an extended family household) do not. We propose a theoretical model of the household based on the idea that altruism between household members vary with familial ties which generates predictions consistent with the observed empirical patterns.

Keywords: Intra-household Allocation; Social Norms; Extended Families; Altruism; Household Farms; Income Shocks; Risk-sharing; Consumption Smoothing (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: O12 D13 Q1 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2016-01
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-soc
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Related works:
Journal Article: Intra-household resource allocation and familial ties (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Intra-household Resource Allocation and Familial Ties (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: Intra-household Resource Allocation and Familial Ties (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: Intra-household Resource Allocation and Familial Ties (2016) Downloads
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