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On the Relationship between Lifestyle and Happiness in the UK

Adelina Gschwandtner (), Sarah Jewell and Uma Kambhampati ()

Studies in Economics from School of Economics, University of Kent

Abstract: In the present paper we attempt to analyse the relationship between ‘lifestyle’ and happiness in the UK using fixed effects and granger causality tests to test for endogeneity. We split the analysis by gender and find different effects between women and men. While men seem to be more physically active and this active lifestyle impacts stronger on their wellbeing than on the one of women, women seem to be more conscientious with respect to nutrition and nutrition impacts stronger on the wellbeing of women than on the wellbeing of men. In general lifestyle variables have a significantly positive impact on happiness and the impact remains significant with the use of fixed effects for both genders. This suggests that a ‘healthy lifestyle’ has a positive impact on happiness and that any policy improving our lifestyle proxies would also make people happier in the UK.

Keywords: Wellbeing; Life Satisfaction; Happiness; Nutrition; Exercise; Lifestyle; Fixed Effects; Granger Causality (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D31 I31 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dem, nep-eur, nep-hap and nep-hpe
Date: 2016-12
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https://www.kent.ac.uk/economics/repec/1613.pdf (application/pdf)

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Working Paper: On the Relationship between Lifestyle and Happiness in the UK (2015) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ukc:ukcedp:1613

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