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Rethinking Monetary and Financial Policy: Practical suggestions for monitoring financial stability while generating employment and poverty reduction

Gerald Epstein

Published Studies from Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Abstract: As the world financial crisis deepens, the task of generating decent employment has taken on more urgency, yet now faces even more obstacles then before. Of course, a key component of the solution to the current crisis will be massive expansionary fiscal actions on the part of the rich countries, preferably in a coordinated fashion, but individually if necessary. More aid and support from the rich countries and international institutions to the developing world will also be necessary to avoid a very serious, negative shock for the world's poorest and most vulnerable. In the short and medium run, as before the recent crisis, the key will be to generate large scale increases in decent work if developing countries and the world are to avoid a downward spiral into depression. But what macroeconomic policy frameworks should be used to design policies to address this crises both in the short and in the medium terms? What is clear is that to design and carry out these employment-oriented macroeconomic policies, the old neo-libereal orthodoxy must be abandoned, and policy makers must look for other policy frameworks to inform their macroeconomic and financial policies. In this paper, Epstein summarize employment oriented macroeconomic and financial policies that governments in developing countries can adopt to help promote more and better employment as a key to reducing poverty over the medium to long run.

New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-mac and nep-pke
Date: 2009
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