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Beyond knowledge brokerage: An exploratory study of innovation intermediaries in an evolving smallholder agricultural system in Kenya

Catherine W. Kilelu (), Laurens Klerkx (), Cees Leeuwis () and Andrew Hall ()
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Catherine W. Kilelu: RIU, Communication and Innovation Studies Group, Wageningen University
Laurens Klerkx: Communication and Innovation Studies Group, Wageningen University
Cees Leeuwis: Communication and Innovation Studies Group, Wageningen University

No 22, MERIT Working Papers from United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT)

Abstract: The recognition that innovation occurs in networks of heterogeneous actors and requires broad systemic support beyond knowledge brokering has resulted in a changing landscape of the intermediary domain in an increasingly market-driven agricultural sector in developing countries. This paper presents findings of an explorative case study that looked at 22 organisations identified as fulfilling an intermediary role in the Kenyan agricultural sector. The results show that these organisations fulfill functions that are not limited to distribution of knowledge and putting it into use. The functions also include fostering integration and interaction among the diverse actors engaged in innovation networks and working on technological, organisational and institutional innovation. Further, the study identified various organisational arrangements of innovation intermediaries with some organisations fulfilling a specialised innovation brokering role, even as other intermediaries take on brokering as a side activity, while still substantively contributing to the innovation process. Based on these findings we identify a typology of 4 innovation intermediation arrangements, including technology brokers, systemic brokers, enterprise development support and input access support. The results indicate that innovation brokering is a pervasive task in supporting innovation and will require policy support to embed it in innovation support arrangements. The paper is not normative about these arrangements.

Keywords: Smallholder agriculture; innovation intermediaries; agriculture innovation; knowledge brokers; Kenya (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: L26 L32 N5 N57 O13 O19 O31 O32 O55 Q12 Q13 Q16 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2011
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