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Widowhood and barriers to seeking health care in Uganda

Nyasha Tirivayi ()

No 2014-067, MERIT Working Papers from United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT)

Abstract: This study examined whether widowhood was associated with experiencing barriers to seeking health care in Uganda. Data from 8674 women aged between 15 and 49 years in the 2011 Uganda Demographic Health Survey, were analysed using multivariable logistic regression models. Compared to other women, widows were more likely to identify getting money for treatment and not wanting to visit health facilities alone as barriers. The odds for encountering barriers were higher for poor and uneducated widows and to some extent for non-poor widows and those with a basic education. Widows are at greater risk of experiencing barriers to health care seeking than other women and may require special consideration in poor countries.

Keywords: Widowhood; Widows; Access to services; Health care; Uganda (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I14 I30 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2014-07-31
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea
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