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Regional inequalities in Italy in the long run (1891-2001): the pattern and some ideas to explain it

Emanuele Felice

Department of Economics University of Siena from Department of Economics, University of Siena

Abstract: The article in the first instance aims to present the pattern of regional inequality in Italy over the long run, through benchmark years, for what regards per capita value added, but also human capital (education) and social capital. Secondly, the Italian case is discussed in view of the neoclassical approach, which incorporates human and social capital as conditioning variables in a long term production function, through both cross-section and dynamic panel regressions. The results are compared with those from descriptive statistics, concluding that the neoclassical modelling can hardly add something more to a mere correlation evidence. As a consequence, this paper explores the viability of alternative approaches, which should properly consider historical changes in technology, in institutions and in the production function, and briefly reviews the research to come in order to implement a dynamic model

JEL-codes: E01 E10 N93 N94 R11 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2010-06
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-geo
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