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Temporary employment, job satisfaction and subjective well-being

Chris Dawson and Michail Veliziotis ()

Working Papers from Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol

Abstract: This paper is concerned with whether employees on temporary contracts in Britain report lower well-being than those on permanent contracts, and whether this relationship is mechanised by differences in certain aspects of job satisfaction. Previous research has identified a well-being gap between permanent and temporary employees but has not addressed what individual and contract specific characteristics contribute to this observed difference. Using data from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS), this paper finds that a large proportion of the difference in self-reported well-being between permanent and temporary employees appears to be explained by differences in satisfaction with job security. Other dimensions of job satisfaction are found to be less important. This leads us to believe that an employment contract characterised by a definite duration lowers individual well-being principally through a heightened feeling of job insecurity.

Keywords: Temporary employment; well-being; job satisfaction (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J28 J41 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2013-01-09
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-eur, nep-hap, nep-lab and nep-lma
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Citations: View citations in EconPapers (13) Track citations by RSS feed

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http://www2.uwe.ac.uk/faculties/BBS/BUS/Research/Economics13/1309.pdf

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Journal Article: Temporary employment, job satisfaction and subjective well-being (2017) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:uwe:wpaper:20131309

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