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Information asymmetry, financialisation and financial access

Simplice Asongu () and Nicholas Odhiambo ()

No 23931, Working Papers from University of South Africa, Department of Economics

Abstract: This study investigates whether information sharing channels that are meant to reduce information asymmetry have led to an increase in financial access. The study employs a Generalised Method of Moments technique using data from 53 African countries during the period from 2004-2011 to examine this linkage. Information sharing channels are theoretically designed to promote the formal financial sector and discourage the informal financial sector. The study uses two information sharing channels: private credit bureaus and public credit registries. The study found that both information sharing channels have a positive and significant impact on financial access. The study also found that public credit registries complement the formal financial sector to promote financial access. The policy implications are discussed.

Keywords: Information asymmetry; Financialisation; Financial Access; Africa (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018-05-18
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http://uir.unisa.ac.za/bitstream/handle/10500/2393 ... nancial%20access.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Information asymmetry, financialization, and financial access (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: Information Asymmetry, Financialisation and Financial Access (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: Information Asymmetry, Financialisation and Financial Access (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: INFORMATION ASYMMETRY, FINANCIALISATION AND FINANCIAL ACCESS (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: Information Asymmetry, Financialisation and Financial Access (2018) Downloads
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