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Inequality and the economic participation of women in Sub-Saharan Africa: An empirical investigation

Simplice Asongu () and Nicholas Odhiambo ()

No 25483, Working Papers from University of South Africa, Department of Economics

Abstract: This study investigates the effect of inequality on female employment in 42 countries in sub-Saharan Africa for the period 2004-2014. Three inequality indicators are used, namely, the: Gini coefficient, Atkinson index and Palma ratio. Two indicators of gender inclusion are also employed, namely: female employment and female unemployment rates. The empirical analysis is based on the Generalised Method of Moments (GMM).The following main findings are established. First, inequality increases female unemployment in regressions based on the Palma ratio. Second, from the robustness checks, inequality reduces female employment within the frameworks of the Gini coefficient and Palma ratio.

Keywords: Africa; Gender; Inclusive development (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019-05
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Related works:
Working Paper: Inequality and the Economic Participation of Women in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Empirical Investigation (2019) Downloads
Working Paper: Inequality and the Economic Participation of Women in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Empirical Investigation (2019) Downloads
Working Paper: Inequality and the Economic Participation of Women in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Empirical Investigation (2019) Downloads
Working Paper: Inequality and the Economic Participation of Women in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Empirical Investigation (2019) Downloads
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