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Income levels,governance and inlusive human development in Sub-Saharan Africa

Simplice Asongu () and Nicholas Odhiambo ()

No 25589, Working Papers from University of South Africa, Department of Economics

Abstract: This study examines how income-driven governance affects inclusive human development in Sub-Saharan Africa with data for the period 2000-2012. The empirical evidence is based on the Generalised Method of Moments (GMM) and Tobit regressions. Nine bundled and unbundled concepts of governance are used: political (voice & accountability and political stability/no violence), economic (government effectiveness and regulation quality) and institutional (corruption-control and the rule of law) governances. The main finding is that ?middle income?-driven governance has a higher effect on inclusive human development than ?low income?-driven governance. Policy implications are discussed in the light of: (i) the contemporary relevance of findings; (ii) the pivotal role of a higher income level in the post-2015 sustainable development agenda; and (iii) inconsistent strands in the literature and in foreign aid policies.

Keywords: Inclusive development; Income levels; Governance; Africa (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019-07
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Related works:
Working Paper: Income Levels, Governance and Inclusive Human Development in Sub-Saharan Africa (2019) Downloads
Working Paper: Income Levels, Governance and Inclusive Human Development in Sub-Saharan Africa (2019) Downloads
Working Paper: Income Levels, Governance and Inclusive Human Development in Sub-Saharan Africa (2019) Downloads
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