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A gendered assessment of the brain drain

Frédéric Docquier (), B. Lindsay Lowell and Abdeslam Marfouk ()

No 4613, Policy Research Working Paper Series from The World Bank

Abstract: This paper updates and extends the Docquier-Marfouk data set on inter-national migration by educational attainment. The authors use new sources, homogenize definitions of what a migrant is, and compute gender-disaggregated indicators of the brain drain. Emigration stocks and rates are provided by level of schooling and gender for 195 source countries in 1990 and 2000. The data set can be used to capture the recent trend in women's skilled migration and to analyze its causes and consequences for developing countries. The .findings show that women represent an increasing share of the OECD immigration stock and exhibit relatively higher rates of brain drain than men. The gender gap in skilled migration is strongly correlated with the gender gap in educational attainment at origin. Equating women's and men's access to education would probably reduce gender differences in the brain drain.

Keywords: Population Policies; Gender and Development; Access to Finance; International Migration; Anthropology (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-edu, nep-hrm, nep-lab and nep-mig
Date: 2008-05-01
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Related works:
Working Paper: A gendered assessment of the brain drain (2007) Downloads
Working Paper: A Gendered Assessment of the Brain Drain (2007) Downloads
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