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Accounting for heterogeneity in growth incidence in Cameroon

Essama-Nssah, , B., Leandre Bassol3 and Saumik Paul

No 5464, Policy Research Working Paper Series from The World Bank

Abstract: This paper presents counterfactual decompositions based on both the Shapley method and a generalization of the Oaxaca-Blinder approach to identify proximate factors that might explain differences in the distribution of economic welfare in Cameroon in 1996-2007. In particular, the analysis uses re-centered influence function regressions to link the growth incidence curve for 2001-2007 to household characteristics and account for heterogeneity of impact across quantiles in terms of the composition (or endowment) effect and structural (or price) effect. The analysis finds that the level of the growth incidence curve is explained by the endowment effect while its shape is driven by the price effect. Observed gains at the bottom of the distribution are due to returns to endowments. The rest of the gains are accounted for by the composition effect. Further decomposition of these effects shows that the composition effect is determined mainly by household demographics while the structural effect is shaped by the sector of employment and geography. Finally, analysis of the rural-urban gap in living standards shows that, for the poorest households in both sectors, differences in household characteristics matter more than the returns to those characteristics. The opposite is true for better-off households.

Keywords: Rural Poverty Reduction; Achieving Shared Growth; Regional Economic Development; Economic Theory&Research (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2010-11-01
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-afr
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