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The effect of weather-induced internal migration on local labor markets: evidence from Uganda

Eric Strobl () and Marie-Anne Valfort ()

No 6600, Policy Research Working Paper Series from The World Bank

Abstract: Relying on census data collected in 2002 and historical weather data for Uganda, this paper estimates the impact of weather-induced internal migration on the probability for non-migrants living in the destination regions to be employed. Consistent with the prediction of a simple theoretical model, the results reveal a larger negative impact than the one documented for developed countries. They further show that this negative impact is significantly stronger in Ugandan regions with lower road density and therefore less conducive to capital mobility: a 10 percentage points increase in the net in-migration rate in these areas decreases the probability of being employed of non-migrants by more than 10 percentage points.

Keywords: Population Policies; Regional Economic Development; Banks&Banking Reform; Transport Economics Policy&Planning; Labor Markets (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2013-09-01
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Related works:
Journal Article: The Effect of Weather-Induced Internal Migration on Local Labor Markets. Evidence from Uganda (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: The Effect of Weather-Induced Internal Migration on Local Labor Markets: Evidence from Uganda (2012) Downloads
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