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The effects of the intensity, timing, and persistence of personal history of mobility on support for redistribution

Andrew Dabalen, Rasyad Parinduri () and Saumik Paul

No 6803, Policy Research Working Paper Series from The World Bank

Abstract: This paper examines the association between the intensity, timing, and persistence of personal history of mobility on individual support for redistribution. Using both rounds of the Life in Transition Survey, the paper builds measures of downward mobility for about 57,000 individuals from 27 countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. The analysis finds that more intensive, recent, and persistent downward mobility increases support for redistribution more. A number of extensions and checks are done by, among others, taking into account systematic bias in perceived mobility experience, considering an alternative definition of redistributive preferences, and exploring the severity of omitted variable bias problems. Overall, the results are robust.

Keywords: Housing&Human Habitats; Roads&Highways; Teaching and Learning; Science Education; Scientific Research&Science Parks (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cwa and nep-tra
Date: 2014-03-01
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Related works:
Journal Article: The effects of the intensity, timing and persistence of personal history of mobility on support for redistribution in transition countries (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: The Effects of the Intensity, Timing and Persistance of Personal History of Mobility on Support for Redistribution Downloads
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