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Prospects for equitable growth in rural sub-Saharan Africa

Steven Haggblade () and Peter B. Hazell

No 8, Policy Research Working Paper Series from The World Bank

Abstract: Improving agricultural technology equitably in Africa has been difficult in the past because of the vast differences, as well as weak institutions and infrastructure in its many regions. However, the prospects for equitable growth are good for several reasons. The distribution of land has not deteriorated, and there are few landless people in Africa. Technical packages do not favor large farms over small ones, and Africa's social institutions support people with a safety net for sources of income. The author, however, points out that equitable growth, though possible is not assured and several research and policy initiatives will be needed to capitalize on the potential. First, research must continue to focus on technology appropriate for small farms and crops. Policy makers must no longer withhold assistance from service enterprises or nonfarm activities of women. Rural infrastructure has to be upgraded, and finally, governments will need to monitor land tenure and tenancy.

Keywords: Economic Theory&Research; Agricultural Research; Crops&Crop Management Systems; Environmental Economics&Policies; Agricultural Knowledge&Information Systems (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 1988-04-30
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