EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Leaving, staying, or coming back ? migration decisions during the northern Mali conflict

Johannes G. Hoogeveen, Mariacristina Rossi () and Dario Sansone ()

No 8012, Policy Research Working Paper Series from The World Bank

Abstract: This paper uses a unique data set to analyze the migration dynamics of refugees, returnees, and internally displaced people during the Northern Mali conflict. Individuals were interviewed monthly using mobile phones. The results cast light on the characteristics of these three groups before and after the crisis. In addition, the paper tests how employment status, security, and expectations affect people's willingness to go back home. The findings suggest that the decision to return is affected by a comparison of (opportunity) costs and benefits, but also by other factors. Individuals who are employed while displaced are less willing to go back to the North, as are better educated individuals or those receiving assistance. The opposite is true for those whose ethnicity is Songhai, as well as for those who originated from Kidal. The results show that higher educated individuals performed better when displaced and in case they decide to return, they find a job more easily.

Keywords: Inequality; Social Cohesion; Services&Transfers to Poor; Disability; Access of Poor to Social Services; Economic Assistance; Conflict and Fragile States (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017-03-22
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/314851490196178166/pdf/WPS8012.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Leaving, staying or coming back? An analysis of the migration dynamics during the Northern Mali conflict (2018) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:8012

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Policy Research Working Paper Series from The World Bank 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Roula I. Yazigi ().

 
Page updated 2019-09-18
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:8012