EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Does it pay to win the Stanley Cup?

Derek Lanoue ()
Additional contact information
Derek Lanoue: Department of Economics, University of Windsor

No 1502, Working Papers from University of Windsor, Department of Economics

Abstract: Yes, it does indeed pay to win the Stanley Cup (SC). Professional sports offer a unique opportunity to examine the relationship between a player’s salary and their performance. Salary statistics have become widely available and enable individual performance scrutiny in relation to remuneration level. There is an extensive literature explaining which factors in‡uence the players’ salary in the National Hockey League (NHL), using data sets from different seasons and including various performance indicators. Although much is known about salary and performance in professional hockey, there is a lack of understanding and empirical evidence of the pecuniary value of winning the Stanley Cup (SC) - the trophy awarded annually to the NHL playoff champion and the ultimate prize in professional hockey. Our empirical analysis suggests that winning the Stanley cup the season prior to signing a new contract earns players a 19% wage premium on their next contract.

Keywords: National Hockey League; NHL; Salary; Stanley Cup; Hockey Analytics (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J24 J31 J33 J44 L83 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 16 pages
Date: 2015-06
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hrm and nep-spo
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://web2.uwindsor.ca/economics/RePEc/wis/pdf/1502.pdf First version, 2015 (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:wis:wpaper:1502

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from University of Windsor, Department of Economics Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Christian Trudeau ().

 
Page updated 2022-08-16
Handle: RePEc:wis:wpaper:1502