EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

A Lasting Effect of the HIV/AIDS Pandemic: Orphans and Pro-Social Behavior

Bryan McCannon and Zachary Rodriguez
Additional contact information
Zachary Rodriguez: Saint Bonaventure University

No 16-10, Working Papers from Department of Economics, West Virginia University

Abstract: The HIV/AIDS pandemic has caused numerous deaths. One unfortunate consequence of this is the deterioration in family structure and the prevalence of orphanhood. We investigate whether individuals who were orphaned as a child suffer long-term consequences through a underinvestment in their social capital. We conduct a framed field experiment in rural, southern Uganda where the HIV/AIDS pandemic hit hardest. In the experiment, subjects made decisions to contribute to a public good. Results indicate that adults who were orphaned as a child free ride more contributing less to the public good. We explore the mechanism through which their background operates. We provide evidence that an important channel is through social norms. Subjects orphaned when young tend to have lower expectations regarding typical behavior of others. A strong interaction effect is identified where those with the lowest expectations who were also orphaned contribute the least to the public good. Thus, we document long-term consequences to a community of the adverse health event.

Keywords: HIV/AIDS; orphan; pro-social behavior; public good; social capital; social norm; Uganda (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: C93 D03 I15 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 33 pages
Date: 2016-06
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-evo, nep-exp, nep-hea and nep-soc
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations:

Downloads: (external link)
http://busecon.wvu.edu/phd_economics/pdf/16-10.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:wvu:wpaper:16-10

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from Department of Economics, West Virginia University Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Feng Yao ().

 
Page updated 2024-04-17
Handle: RePEc:wvu:wpaper:16-10