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Tracking pupils into adulthood: selective schools and long-term well-being in the 1958 British cohort

Jones, A.M.;, Chiara Pastore and Nigel Rice

Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers from HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York

Abstract: We explore the effect of tracking pupils by ability into different secondary schools on adult health, well-being and labour outcomes in England. We address selection bias by balancing individual pre-treatment characteristics via entropy matching, followed by parametric regressions estimated via OLS and IV approaches. Ability tracking does not affect long-term health and well-being, while it marginally raises hourly wages for low-ability pupils, compared to a mixed-ability system. Cognitive and non-cognitive abilities measured prior to secondary school are more significant and positive predictors of adult outcomes. Particularly, non-cognitive skills may have a protective role for adult health for lower cognitive ability children.

Keywords: ability tracking; educational reform; well-being; health; entropy balancing; instrumental variables (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I26 I28 I1 C21 C26 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-eur and nep-hap
Date: 2018-11
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