EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Teen Social Interactions and Well-being during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Charlene Kalenkoski and Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia

No 1324, GLO Discussion Paper Series from Global Labor Organization (GLO)

Abstract: Adolescence is an important developmental period when teens begin spending less time with their parents and more time with friends and others outside their households as they transition into adulthood. Using the 2017-2021 American Time Use Surveys and the 2012, 2013, and 2021 Well-being Modules, we examine how the time teens spent alone and with parents, friends, and others changed during the COVID-19 pandemic, shedding light on how the social isolation of the pandemic disrupted this crucial development period. We also examine how time spent on various activities changed during the pandemic. Teens spent more time alone during the pandemic than before and spent more of their leisure time alone, with large increases in time spent playing computer games, on social media, and watching TV. Results suggest that socializing and communicating with others improves teens' well-being over other activities. Thus, teens' well-being was severely impacted by the pandemic.

Keywords: teens; adolescents; COVID-19; well-being; time use; gaming (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J13 J22 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2023
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hap, nep-hea and nep-soc
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations:

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/276226/1/GLO-DP-1324.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Teen Social Interactions and Well-Being during the COVID-19 Pandemic (2023) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:zbw:glodps:1324

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in GLO Discussion Paper Series from Global Labor Organization (GLO) Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics ().

 
Page updated 2024-03-31
Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:1324