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Obesity inequality and the changing shape of the bodyweight distribution in China

Peng Nie, Lanlin Ding and Alfonso Sousa-Poza

No 24-2018, Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences from University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences

Abstract: Using data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), this study analyses changes in bodyweight (BMI and waist circumference) distributions between 1991 and 2011 among adults aged 20+ in China. To do so, we quantify the source and extent of temporal changes in bodyweight and then decompose the increase in obesity prevalence into two components: a rightward shift of the bodyweight distribution (mean growth) and a (re)distributional skewing. Our analysis reveals a clear rightward distributional shift combined with a leftward skewing. Although the relatively large size of this skewing in the first decade analysed reflects an increase in obesity inequality, this inequality growth subsides in the second decade. Nevertheless, over the entire 20-year period, obesity inequality increases significantly, especially among females, younger age groups, rural residents and individuals with low socioeconomic status.

Keywords: BMI; Waist circumference; Obesity inequality; Decomposition; China (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D30 D63 I10 I14 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cna, nep-dev, nep-hea and nep-tra
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1)

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Journal Article: Obesity inequality and the changing shape of the bodyweight distribution in China (2019) Downloads
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