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Climate Change and the Relocation of Population

Jasmin Gröschl

Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century from Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association

Abstract: Do natural disasters trigger intensified international migration? The aim of this paper is to assess the extent to which disasters initiate bilateral migration. To motivate the empirical strategy, I construct a stylized theoretical gravity model of migration that introduces disasters as random shocks. I present estimations that deploy a dataset of bilateral migration available for increments of 10 years from 1960-2010 for a large matrix of countries. Results suggest that disasters are on average positively associated with migration out of affected areas, but negatively for migration into affected countries. In addition, I show that results are primarily caused by disasters related to climate change. Migration to and from non-OECD and particularly middle income countries drive the patterns.

JEL-codes: F22 O15 Q54 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2012
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