EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Money vs. time: family income, maternal labor supply, and child development

Francesco Agostinelli and Giuseppe Sorrenti

No 273, ECON - Working Papers from Department of Economics - University of Zurich

Abstract: We study the effect of family income and maternal hours worked on child development. Our instrumental variable analysis suggests different results for cognitive and behavioral development. An additional $1,000 in family income improves cognitive development by 4.4 percent of a standard deviation but has no effect on behavioral development. A yearly increase of 100 work hours negatively affects both outcomes by approximately 6 percent of a standard deviation. The quality of parental investment matters and the substitution effect (less parental time) dominates the income effect (higher earnings) when the after-tax hourly wage is below $13.50. Results call for consideration of child care and minimum wage policies that foster both maternal employment and child development.

Keywords: Child development; family income; maternal labor supply (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: H24 H31 I21 I38 J13 J22 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dem and nep-lma
Date: 2018-01
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (2) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.econ.uzh.ch/static/wp/econwp273.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Money vs. Time: Family Income, Maternal Labor Supply, and Child Development (2018) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:zur:econwp:273

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in ECON - Working Papers from Department of Economics - University of Zurich Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Marita Kieser ().

 
Page updated 2018-07-25
Handle: RePEc:zur:econwp:273