EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Inequality and agricultural production: Evidence from aggregate agriculture and sugarcane farms in South Africa

Nicholas Ngepah ()

African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 2010, vol. 05, issue 2, 19

Abstract: This article explores the determinants of inequality in productivity in South African agriculture and differentiates between small-scale and large-scale farms in the sugarcane sector. The findings suggest that inequality slows down productivity and that land redistribution slightly improves it. Farm type-specific effects reveal that redistribution per se does not lead to higher production, but only improves production for those who farm the land effectively and go on to harvest the crop. Much of the difference in land productivity between the two farm types arises from disparity in input use, particularly fertilizer and irrigation. Some mutually beneficial collaboration between the two types is possible, skewed in favor of small farms. For small-scale farmers, access to land is necessary but not sufficient: other factors such as fertilizer, irrigation, chemicals and human capital (particularly literacy) must be prioritized. Any policy that creates conflicts between the two types will jeopardize agricultural production, to the detriment of small-scale producers.

Keywords: Crop Production/Industries; Land Economics/Use (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2010
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/156671/files/7% ... epah%20-%20FINAL.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:afjare:156671

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.156671

Access Statistics for this article

More articles in African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics from African Association of Agricultural Economists Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by AgEcon Search ().

 
Page updated 2020-09-19
Handle: RePEc:ags:afjare:156671