EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The impact of micro-irrigation on households’ welfare in the northern part of Ethiopia: an endogenous switching regression approach

Kidanemariam G. Gebrehiwot, Daniel Makina and Thomas Woldu
Authors registered in the RePEc Author Service: Thomas Woldu Assefa ()

Studies in Agricultural Economics, 2017, vol. 119, issue 3

Abstract: The paper uses an endogenous switching regression model to measure the impact of participation in micro-irrigation development on households’ welfare. The model takes into account selection bias associated with programme participation and endogeneity problems often encountered in most programme evaluations. A total of 482 households (195 irrigation users and 287 non-users) were used to generate all the necessary variables. To capture the impact of the irrigation on household welfare, two indicators were considered, namely household farm income (Y) and household fixed asset formation (F) (evaluated at market price during the survey period). The results show a positive and significant impact of irrigation use on the two outcome variables: income by 8.8 per cent and asset formation by 186 per cent as compared to non-users. This shows how important the micro-irrigation schemes are in improving the welfare of poor farmers in the research areas. Furthermore, the empirical results show that the probability of using one of the water sources (irrigation scheme) is associated with farm experience (age as proxy), farmer-to-farmer contact (the existence of an irrigation user neighbour), family size, the state of credit constraint, the number of visits by extension agents and the cost of irrigation development. As a robustness check, different models were applied and results were found consistent, both qualitatively and quantitatively.

Keywords: Agribusiness; Agricultural and Food Policy; Consumer/Household Economics; Crop Production/Industries; Environmental Economics and Policy; Farm Management; Food Security and Poverty; Land Economics/Use; Production Economics; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy; Risk and Uncertainty; Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/266797/files/Studies%20119-3_1707.pdf (application/pdf)
https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/266797/files/S ... 7.pdf?subformat=pdfa (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:stagec:266797

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.266797

Access Statistics for this article

More articles in Studies in Agricultural Economics from Research Institute for Agricultural Economics Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by AgEcon Search ().

 
Page updated 2021-05-15
Handle: RePEc:ags:stagec:266797