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Occupational Access and Wage Discrimination

Peter Dolton and Michael P Kidd ()

Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, 1994, vol. 56, issue 4, 457-74

Abstract: It is well known that the occupational distribution for males and females differ significantly in Britain. The implications of this difference are explored in a joint model of earnings and occupation choice. The role and relative importance of inter- and inter-occupational effects are evaluated as contributors to the male/female wage differential. The model explicitly incorporates the endogeneity of occupation choice and examines the role of sample selection in occupation specific wage equations. The main conclusions following from the econometric results are that the role of intra-occupation gender wage differences dwarfs that of inter-occupation differences. The most important contributor to the overall gap in male/female wages is the unjustified within-occupation component, which arises from the unequal treatment of male and female productive characteristics within a given occupation. Copyright 1994 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Date: 1994
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