EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

On the origin of shared beliefs (and corporate culture)

Eric Van den Steen

RAND Journal of Economics, 2010, vol. 41, issue 4, 617-648

Abstract: This article shows how corporate culture, in the sense of shared beliefs and values, originates (often unintentionally) through screening, self‐sorting, and manager‐directed joint learning. It shows that such culture will be stronger among more important employees and in older and more successful firms where employees make important decisions and the manager has strong beliefs. It further shows how a manager's beliefs influence culture, how culture persists despite turnover, and why the suggested link between culture and performance may be a case of inverse causality. It finally shows that, from an outsider's perspective, organizations may tend to overinvest in corporate culture.

Date: 2010
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (45) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1756-2171.2010.00114.x

Related works:
Working Paper: On the Origin of Shared Beliefs (and Corporate Culture) (2005) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:bla:randje:v:41:y:2010:i:4:p:617-648

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.blackwell ... al.asp?ref=0741-6261

Access Statistics for this article

RAND Journal of Economics is currently edited by James Hosek

More articles in RAND Journal of Economics from RAND Corporation Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Wiley Content Delivery ().

 
Page updated 2022-11-01
Handle: RePEc:bla:randje:v:41:y:2010:i:4:p:617-648