EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Fertility Reactions to the "Great Recession" in Europe

Joshua Goldstein, Michaela Kreyenfeld, Aiva Jasilioniene and Deniz Karaman Örsal ()
Additional contact information
Joshua Goldstein: Max-Planck-Institut für Demografische Forschung
Michaela Kreyenfeld: Hertie School of Governance
Aiva Jasilioniene: Max-Planck-Institut für Demografische Forschung

Demographic Research, 2013, vol. 29, issue 4, 85-104

Abstract: Objective: This paper provides recent cross-national evidence of the impact of the great recession on fertility in Europe in the context of the recent decade. Methods: Using data from the Human Fertility Database (HFD), from Eurostat, and from the OECD database, we employ fixed-effects modeling to study how changes in unemployment rates have affected birth rates across Europe. Results: We find that countries that were hit hard by the recession show reduced fertility when compared with a continuation of recent trends, especially at younger ages. Conclusions: Our results indicate a strong relationship between economic conditions and fertility. However, there is variation by region, age, and parity suggesting the importance of life course and institutional factors.

Keywords: fertility; birth order; Europe; unemployment; uncertainty (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J1 Z0 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2013
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (3) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol29/4/29-4.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:dem:demres:v:29:y:2013:i:4

DOI: 10.4054/DemRes.2013.29.4

Access Statistics for this article

More articles in Demographic Research from Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Editorial Office ().

 
Page updated 2020-09-19
Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:29:y:2013:i:4