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The effect of instructor race and gender on student persistence in STEM fields

Joshua Price ()

Economics of Education Review, 2010, vol. 29, issue 6, 901-910

Abstract: The objective of this study is to determine if minority and female students are more likely to persist in a science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) major when they enroll in classes taught by instructors of their own race or gender. Using data from public 4-year universities in the state of Ohio, I analyze first semester STEM courses to see if the race or gender of the instructor effects persistence of initial STEM majors in a STEM field after the first semester and first year. Results indicate that black students are more likely to persist in a STEM major if they have a STEM course taught by a black instructor. Similar to previous findings, female students are less likely to persist when more of their STEM courses are taught by female instructors.

Keywords: Human; capital; Educational; economics (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2010
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Citations: View citations in EconPapers (45)

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