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The effect of job flexibility on female labor market outcomes: Estimates from a search and bargaining model

Luca Flabbi and Andrea Moro ()

Journal of Econometrics, 2012, vol. 168, issue 1, 81-95

Abstract: In this article, we develop a search model of the labor market in which jobs are characterized by work hours’ flexibility. Workers value flexibility, which is costly for employers to provide. We estimate the model on a sample of women extracted from the CPS. The model parameters are empirically identified because the accepted wage distributions of flexible and non-flexible jobs are directly related to the preference for flexibility parameters. Results show that more than one-third of women place a small, positive value on flexibility. Women with a college degree value flexibility more than women with only a high school degree. Counterfactual experiments show that flexibility has a substantial impact on the wage distribution but a negligible impact on the unemployment rate. These results suggest that wage and schooling differences between males and females may be importantly related to flexibility.

Date: 2012
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Related works:
Working Paper: The Effect of Job Flexibility on Female Labor Market Outcomes: Estimates from a Search and Bargaining Model (2011) Downloads
Working Paper: The Effect of Job Flexibility on Female Labor Market Outcomes: Estimates from a Search and Bargaining Model (2010) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:econom:v:168:y:2012:i:1:p:81-95

DOI: 10.1016/j.jeconom.2011.09.003

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Journal of Econometrics is currently edited by T. Amemiya, A. R. Gallant, J. F. Geweke, C. Hsiao and P. M. Robinson

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