EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Minimum wages and youth unemployment

Aspen Gorry

European Economic Review, 2013, vol. 64, issue C, 57-75

Abstract: This paper constructs a labor search model to explore the effects of minimum wages on youth unemployment. To capture the gradual decline in unemployment for young workers as they age, the standard search model is extended so that workers gain experience when employed. Experienced workers have higher average productivity and lower job finding and separation rates that match wage and worker flow data. In this environment, minimum wages can have large effects on unemployment because they interact with a worker's ability to gain job experience. The increase in minimum wages between 2007 and 2009 can account for a 0.8 percentage point increase in the steady state unemployment rate and a 2.8 percentage point increase in unemployment for 15–24 year old workers in the model parameterized to simulate outcomes of high school educated workers. Minimum wages can also help explain the high rates of youth unemployment in France compared to the United States.

Keywords: Minimum wage; Youth unemployment; Experience; Fair minimum wage act; France (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: E24 J08 J24 J64 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2013
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (21) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014292113001104
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
Working Paper: Minimum Wages and Youth Employment (2010) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:64:y:2013:i:c:p:57-75

DOI: 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2013.08.004

Access Statistics for this article

European Economic Review is currently edited by T.S. Eicher, A. Imrohoroglu, E. Leeper, J. Oechssler and M. Pesendorfer

More articles in European Economic Review from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Dana Niculescu ().

 
Page updated 2020-04-07
Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:64:y:2013:i:c:p:57-75