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The effect of birth weight on behavioral problems in early adolescence: New evidence from monozygotic twins

Stine Møllegaard

Economics & Human Biology, 2020, vol. 36, issue C

Abstract: It is well-established that the prenatal period is a critical and sensitive period of an individual’s life, linking prenatal circumstances to short- and long-term outcomes such as infant mortality, educational and occupational success. However, little is known about how prenatal nurture affects intermediate outcomes and noncognitive characteristics such as behavior and behavioral problems. In this paper, I investigate the effects of birth weight on behavioral problems at age 12. I comprehensively control for confounders related to family background and genetics by employing a research design exploiting differences among Danish monozygotic twins. I find that birth weight has a statistically significant negative effect on behavioral problems measured using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, and that birth weight affects boys and girls differently: birth weight is significantly negatively associated with emotional problems among girls and hyperactivity among boys.

Keywords: Birth weight; Behavioral problems; Twins; Intermediate effects (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:36:y:2020:i:c:s1570677x19300140

DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2019.100828

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