EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The origins of cognitive skills and non-cognitive skills: The long-term effect of in-utero rainfall shocks in India

Grace Chang, Marta Favara and Rafael Novella ()

Economics & Human Biology, 2022, vol. 44, issue C

Abstract: Skills are an important predictor of labour, education, and wellbeing outcomes. Understanding the origins of skills formation is important for reducing future inequalities. This paper analyses the effect of shocks in-utero on human capital outcomes in childhood and adolescence in India. Combining historical rainfall data and longitudinal data from Young Lives, we estimate the effect of rainfall shocks in-utero on cognitive and non-cognitive skills development over the first 15 years of life. We find negative effects of rainfall shocks on receptive vocabulary at age 5, and on mathematics and non-cognitive skills at age 15. The negative effects on cognitive skills are driven by boys, while the effect for both cognitive and non-cognitive skills are driven by children of parents with lower education, suggesting that prenatal shocks might exacerbate pre-existing inequalities. Our findings support the implementation of policies aiming at reducing inequalities at very early stages in life.

Keywords: Skills formation; In-utero; Rainfall shocks; India (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I14 J24 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2022
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570677X21001143
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
Working Paper: The Origins of Cognitive Skills and Non-cognitive Skills: The Long-Term Effect of in-Utero Rainfall Shocks in India (2020) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:44:y:2022:i:c:s1570677x21001143

DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2021.101089

Access Statistics for this article

Economics & Human Biology is currently edited by J. Komlos, Inas R Kelly and Joerg Baten

More articles in Economics & Human Biology from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Catherine Liu ().

 
Page updated 2023-01-28
Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:44:y:2022:i:c:s1570677x21001143