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Calculation method for electricity end-use for residential lighting

Eva Rosenberg

Energy, 2014, vol. 66, issue C, 295-304

Abstract: Knowledge of the electricity demand for different electrical appliances in households is very important in the work to reduce electricity use in households. Metering of end-uses is expensive and time consuming and therefore other methods for calculation of end-use electricity can be very useful. This paper presents a method to calculate the electricity used for lighting in households based on regression analysis of daily electricity consumption, out-door temperatures and the length of daylight at the same time and location. The method is illustrated with analyses of 45 Norwegian households. The electricity use for lighting in an average Norwegian household is calculated to 1050 kWh/year or 6% of total electricity use. The results are comparable to metering results of lighting in other studies in the Nordic countries. The methodology can also be used to compensate for the seasonal effect when metering electricity for lighting less than a year. When smart meters are more commonly available, the possible adaption of this method will increase, and the need for end-use demand calculations will still be present.

Keywords: Electricity end-use; Lighting; Domestic appliances; Regression analysis (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2014
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